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February 21, 2017 | 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Category: Seminar
Location: Undergraduate Library, David Adamany Bernath Auditorium | Map
5155 Gullen Mall
Detroit, MI 48202
Cost: Free
Audience: Academic Staff, Current Graduate Students, Current Undergraduate Students, Faculty, Staff

The Office of the Vice President for Research is pleased to host the Nano@Wayne seminar on Tuesday, February 21, 2017 at 2:30 p.m to 3:30 p.m. in the Bernath Auditorium located in the David Adamany Undergraduate Library. The seminar is free and open to the public; registration is requested.

The Nano@Wayne Seminar will feature,"Chemically Functionalized Two-Dimensional Nanoelectronic Heterostructures," with Mark Hersam, Ph.D., Northwestern University. Mark C. Hersam is the Walter P. Murphy Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and Director of the Materials Research Center at Northwestern University. He earned a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) in 1996, M.Phil. in Physics from the University of Cambridge in 1997, and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from UIUC in 2000. His research interests include nanofabrication, scanning probe microscopy, semiconductor surfaces, and nanoelectronic materials.

Abstract:

Two-dimensional materials have emerged as promising candidates for next-generation electronic and optoelectronic applications. As is common for new materials, much of the early work has focused on measuring and optimizing intrinsic properties on small samples (e.g., micromechanically exfoliated flakes) under idealized conditions (e.g., vacuum and/or cryogenic temperature environments). However, real-world devices and systems inevitably require large-area samples that are integrated with dielectrics, contacts, and other semiconductors at standard temperature and pressure conditions. These requirements are particularly challenging to realize for two-dimensional materials since their properties are highly sensitive to surface chemistry, defects, and the surrounding environment. This talk will thus explore methods for improving the uniformity of solution-processed two-dimensional materials with an eye toward realizing scalable processing of large-area thin-films.

A short reception will immediately follow the seminar. 

For more information about this event, please contact Kayla Watson at 3135775600 or ft2868@wayne.edu.