What is so atypical about the brains of patients with ‘atypical’ Alzheimer’s disease? Lessons from Neuroimaging and Neuropathology Studies

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Date: February 23, 2021
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Location: Virtual event
Category: Seminar

The Institute of Geronotology (IOG) 2021 Research Colloquia & Professional Development Series is pleased to present:

What is so atypical about the brains of patients with ‘atypical’ Alzheimer’s disease?
Lessons from Neuroimaging and Neuropathology Studies
by

Renaud La Joie, PhD

Researcher
Memory and Aging Center
University of California, San Francisco CA

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has traditionally been described as a slowly progressive, memory-predominant syndrome that affects older adults and leads to dementia. However, it is now widely acknowledged that a significant proportion of patients present with different clinical features: some develop cognitive symptoms in their 50s, and some develop non-amnestic syndromes with predominant language or visuo-spatial difficulties. In this presentation, I will first discuss the recent changes in the definition of AD and will elaborate on the multiple dimensions of AD clinical heterogeneity. I will then describe a series of multimodal (magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography) neuroimaging and neuropathology studies looking at the brain features associated with the clinical heterogeneity of AD. The presentation will emphasize the role of tau pathology (i.e. its severity and its distribution) and co-occurring neuropathological findings in the clinical expression of the disease.
 
BIO:
Dr. Renaud La Joie is a researcher at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Memory and Aging Center. He originally trained in Neuroscience and Neuropsychology in his native France before moving to California for his post-doctoral fellowship at the University of California, Berkeley and then at UCSF. In his research, Dr La Joie combines multimodal neuroimaging techniques, fluid biomarkers, and neuropsychological tools to study the natural history of Alzheimer’s disease with the overarching goal of understanding its underlying processes and improving our ability to provide patients with a precise diagnosis and prognosis. Dr. La Joie has established strong collaborations with neuropathologists at the UCSF neurodegenerative brain bank to help bridge in vivo and post-mortem measures of brain pathology and guide a careful and rigorous interpretation of in vivo biomarker data. 

 

Free and open to all.
IOG 2021 Spring Colloquia Schedule: PDF HERE
Colloquia presented courtesy of the Mary Thompson Foundation 

Colloquia presented courtesy of the Mary Thompson Foundation