Issues in Aging: New Directions in Aging Research

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Date: April 25, 2022
Time: All Day
Location: TBD | Map
Category: Conference

WSU, Institute of Gerontology and the Michigan Chapter of the Alzheimer's Assiociation is pleased to present: 2022 Issues in Aging: New Directions in Aging Research FLYER

Monday, April 25 / 9 am - 3:40 pm

Virtual Zoom Event
6 CEs or Contact Hours TO EARN CEs REGISTER HERE

For large group registration and questions, please contact Donna MacDonald at donnamacdonald@wayne.edu or 248-719-0640therine at cblasio@wayne.edu if you need assistance.

Presentations:
• The Alzheimer’s Crisis: Why It Happened & What We Can Do about It
• The Impact of Pandemic-Related Stress on Trauma-Informed Care in Long-Term Care Settings
• Non-pharmacological Approaches to Improving Cognition in Dementia
• Caregiving Reimagined: Targeting and Tailoring our Approach to Improve Models of Care

If  you would also like to register for (or as) a student/senior click HERE

PROGRAM DETAILS

9:00-10:30 am – 75 minute lecture, 15 minute Q&A
The Alzheimer’s Crisis: Why It Happened & What We Can Do about It

Jason Karlawish, MD, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine
Within just a few decades of the 20th century, Alzheimer’s Disease transformed from a rare medical condition into a very common one -- and then into a crisis. The story of why this happened is a tangle of science, culture and politics. This talk will untangle those events and in doing so, chart ways forward to make us better able to live with the disease.

10:35 am-12:05 pm – 75 minute lecture, 15 minute Q & A
The Impact of Pandemic-Related Stress on Trauma-Informed Care in Long-Term Care Settings

Lisa Lind, PhD
, Deer Oaks: The Behavioral Health Solution
When trauma-informed care initiatives launched in November 2019, the primary goal was to ensure that trauma survivors in long-term care received culturally competent, trauma-informed care to decrease the chance of re-traumatization. A central component was to identify residents with a trauma history to ensure their psychological and psychosocial needs were met. Three months later, however, Covid-19 broke out in the U.S. in a long-term care facility. Since then, LTC residents and staff have been exposed to unparalleled stress and trauma. Dr. Lind will discuss the impact of this pandemic-related stress and trauma in LTC, and how our view of trauma-informed care may need to adapt.


12:35 - 2:05 pm – 75 minute lecture, 15 minute Q & A
Non-pharmacological Approaches to Improving Cognition in Dementia

Ben Hampstead, PhD, University of Michigan, licensed psychologist and clinical ceuropsychologist specializing in aging and dementia.

Exciting progress has been made in the past few years with several promising types of non-pharmacologic interventions now available. Dr. Hampstead will discuss key findings in three primary areas of non-pharmacologic interventions across the dementia spectrum: exercise, cognition oriented treatments (such as cognitive training), and non-invasive brain stimulation. Discussion will center around key methodologic factors necessary for clinical translation and implementation.

2:05 -3:35 pm – 75 minute lecture, 15 minute Q & A
Caregiving Reimagined: Targeting and Tailoring our Approach to Improve Models of Care

Amanda Leggett, PhD, Research Assistant Professor, University of Michigan

Dr. Leggett will detail research on caregiving styles defined by the cognitive-behavioral approaches used by caregivers of persons living with dementia. The associations between caregiving styles and care outcomes will be described, as well as variations seen in how care was managed during the Covid-19 pandemic. She will outline the implications of caregiving styles for the tailoring and targeting of care-focused interventions and services.

Research Assistant Professor

Professionals: HERE

Students/Seniors: HERE

April 2022
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